Monthly Archives

January 2021

Book Recommendations, Pilgrimage, Reading Journey

Free Resource for Christians: Investigating the Resurrection of Jesus Christ

Here is a free Kindle book I was recently told of. I think it would be a great resource for any Christian who wants to dig into Christ’s Resurrection. Below is a brief description of the book and the link for download.

**As a disclaimer, any Amazon links are affiliate links, which means that if you order from the link, I get a small advertising fee at no extra cost to you.**

“This book provides an original and comprehensive assessment of the hypotheses concerning the origin of resurrection Christology. It fills a gap in the literature by addressing these issues using a transdisciplinary approach involving historical-critical study of the New Testament, theology, analytic philosophy, psychology and comparative religion.

Using a novel analytic framework, this book demonstrates that a logically exhaustive list of hypotheses concerning the claims of Jesus’ post-mortem appearances and the outcome of Jesus’ body can be formulated. It addresses these hypotheses in detail, including sophisticated combinations of hallucination hypothesis with cognitive dissonance; memory distortion; and confirmation bias. Addressing writings from both within and outside of Christianity, it also demonstrates how a comparative religion approach might further illuminate the origins of Christianity.

This is a thorough study of arguably the key event in the formation of the Christian faith. As such, it will be of keen interest to theologians, New Testament scholars, philosophers, and scholars of religious studies.”

SDG – “Soli Deo Gloria”

Book Recommendations, Health

Taking Charge of Your Fertility: A Brief Look at Ovulation

As a disclaimer, this blog post if aimed at a mature audience.

You have sex and you get pregnant. Boom! Done and done. That is all it takes, or at least that is what they tell you in school. Technically, it’s only partly correct. You do need to have sex to get pregnant, but at the same time, a very specific event needs to be occurring in your body, and this is something I didn’t learn until I was in my mid-twenties. This event is called ovulation.

Just as a reminder, I am not a doctor, I am just a  girl who wanted to learn how the female reproductive system works so my descriptions won’t be super technical. 

Anyways, ovulation is when your ovaries release an egg to be fertilized. As I’m sure most of us know when the sperm meets the egg and the egg is fertilized, that is when life begins.

Ovulation typically occurs during the second week of a woman’s menstrual cycle but vary from woman to woman.

There are a few signs that we can look for to see if ovulation is occurring. The most common one is called the Fertility Awareness Method. This is when you keep track of your body’s temperature upon waking up and keep a chart of the changes. By doing this, you can see how the shifts in your body temperature reveal what part of your menstrual cycle you are in. By following this method you can identify when you are ovulating and when your period is due to return.

A menstrual cycle follows a particular trend. The month starts off and after a few days, when ovulation is occurring, the temperature dips. After the dip it will rise again confirming that ovulation occured. The temperatures look different for everyone but follow the same ovulation dip and after ovulation temperature rise pattern. When your period is coming back your temperature will drop significantly and it will be followed by Aunt Flo.

In order to monitor your temperature, you would need to monitor your Basal Body Temperature “BBT”. For this, you would need to buy a BBT thermometer and take your temperature every morning at around roughly the same time. Not only do you need to be consistent with the time you take your temperature but you must also take your temperature immediately after waking up before your body starts warming up. If you don’t do this, your temperatures will not be consistent and it is important that they be. For more specific information refer to the book “Taking Charge of Your Fertility” by Toni Weschler, MPH. In this book, you can find detailed charts explaining what the temperature shifts during the menstrual cycle are.

*I am an Amazon affiliate so I may get a small fee for any purchase you may make but this will be of no effect to the price you pay.*

Ovulation usually lasts 24 hours, which is the optimal time to get busy in order to have a baby. And if you are trying to avoid pregnancy this is when you avoid “doing the deed” or are extra careful. In a nutshell this is how it works. You can only get pregnant during your ovulation period. After the egg is gone, the chances of pregnancy are very slim to none. This is why I made that first statement :).

Another way to track ovulation is with Ovulation Prediction Kits also known as “OPKs”, they are not as accurate but can help. I’ll discuss this more in the next post.

SDG – “Soli Deo Gloria”

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